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Scientists and students working through the Feed the Future Peanut Innovation Lab to research peanut farming, marketing and nutrition in Ghana, met in Tamale in July to officially start work. The Innovation Lab is headquartered at the University of Georgia through an agreement with the U.S. Agency for International Development. (Photo by Allison Floyd) CAES News
Scientists and students working through the Feed the Future Peanut Innovation Lab to research peanut farming, marketing and nutrition in Ghana, met in Tamale in July to officially start work. The Innovation Lab is headquartered at the University of Georgia through an agreement with the U.S. Agency for International Development. (Photo by Allison Floyd)
Peanut Innovation Lab holds meeting to launch Ghana projects
The Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Peanut officially started several projects in Ghana this month with a launch meeting to bring together teams of scientists and students from the U.S. and the West African country. The lab is managed out of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences through an agreement with the U.S. Agency for International Development, but involves scientists from a dozen U.S. universities, as well as institutions across partner countries.
African peanut breeders stand in a field in Senegal in 2018, where seeds are replicated for a project to map the genetic diversity of lines grown on the continent. Working with the Feed the Future Peanut Innovation Lab headquartered at the University of Georgia, scientists genotyped hundreds of lines of peanuts grown across Africa. CAES News
African peanut breeders stand in a field in Senegal in 2018, where seeds are replicated for a project to map the genetic diversity of lines grown on the continent. Working with the Feed the Future Peanut Innovation Lab headquartered at the University of Georgia, scientists genotyped hundreds of lines of peanuts grown across Africa.
African peanut breeders explore diversity in genes of local varieties
Groundnut breeders across Africa have wondered at the differences they’d see in nuts that were called the same name but didn’t look alike. Last year, a group of breeders from across the continent put together hundreds of lines of peanuts and, under the auspices of the Peanut Innovation Lab, found out just how similar or different their peanut lines are. The scientists from the national programs in nine countries –Senegal, Ghana, Mali, Togo, Gambia, Uganda, Malawi, Zambia, and Mozambique – met with U.S. scientists last month to review the data collected through an Innovation Lab project called “Genotypic analysis of peanut germplasm using the Axiom_Arachis2 SNP array.”
A farmer from Northern Ghana speaks at the inaugural meeting of the Ghana Groundnut Working Group, a new organization that aims to improve peanut farming, marketing and nutrition in the West African country by bringing together experts across the value chain. The Peanut Innovation Lab at UGA, which is a member of the American Peanut Research and Education Society, sponsored the first meeting. (Photo by Allison Floyd) CAES News
A farmer from Northern Ghana speaks at the inaugural meeting of the Ghana Groundnut Working Group, a new organization that aims to improve peanut farming, marketing and nutrition in the West African country by bringing together experts across the value chain. The Peanut Innovation Lab at UGA, which is a member of the American Peanut Research and Education Society, sponsored the first meeting. (Photo by Allison Floyd)
Ghana groundnut group forms to share knowledge, focus
Bringing together experts in groundnut research from across Ghana, a new organization of scientists aspires to boost the size of the crop and profit for farmers, improve the quality of groundnuts consumers see at the market and increase the supply of nutritious and safe food served in homes. The Ghana Groundnut Working Group met for the first time in July to explore peanut production, economics, technology and benefits in Ghana. The model for the meeting is the American Peanut Research and Education Society, a 51-year-old organization in the United States that has helped the peanut industry in the Americas weather disease and other production problems over recent decades.
UGA peanut researchers Soraya and David Bertioli were honored at the meeting of the American Peanut Research and Education Society with the American Peanut Council Peanut Research and Education Award. CAES News
UGA peanut researchers Soraya and David Bertioli were honored at the meeting of the American Peanut Research and Education Society with the American Peanut Council Peanut Research and Education Award.
UGA peanut researchers win accolades for international impact
Peanut researchers from the University of Georgia met with hundreds of peanut scientists from around the world earlier this week to discuss the international impact of peanut research and to recognize top researchers.
Virginia Tech plant pathologist and Peanut Innovation Lab scientist Maria Balota demonstrates some of the sensors she uses in the high throughput phenotyping project to attendees at the 51st annual American Peanut Research and Education Society meeting in Auburn, Ala. which was held July 9-11, 2019. CAES News
Virginia Tech plant pathologist and Peanut Innovation Lab scientist Maria Balota demonstrates some of the sensors she uses in the high throughput phenotyping project to attendees at the 51st annual American Peanut Research and Education Society meeting in Auburn, Ala. which was held July 9-11, 2019.
Peanut IL shows researchers impact on ‘Peanuts Around the World’
AUBURN, Ala. – The 51st gathering of the American Peanut Research and Education Society brought together hundreds of scientists and students to share cutting-edge research, with a particular focus on the value that international research is having on the U.S. peanut industry. With a theme of “Peanuts Around the World,” the conference called on the Feed the Future Peanut Innovation Lab to demonstrate ways research collaboration has dual benefits for science, industry and agriculture in the U.S. and other countries around the world.
The Feed the Future Peanut Innovation Lab, headquartered at the University of Georgia, brought together U.S. and African scientists to share plans for research projects they are conducting on peanut production, marketing and nutrition in Uganda. CAES News
The Feed the Future Peanut Innovation Lab, headquartered at the University of Georgia, brought together U.S. and African scientists to share plans for research projects they are conducting on peanut production, marketing and nutrition in Uganda.
Peanut innovation projects under way in Uganda
Scientists, students and advisors working on Peanut Innovation Lab projects in Uganda met in late May for a launch meeting in Kampala to celebrate the start of work and share questions and insight about the direction of projects.
CAES News
Breeding powerful traits into peanut varieties
The Peanut Innovation Lab is working not only to find the diversity in modern peanut, but also to introduce new diversity from the wild species. These efforts are aimed at helping to improve future peanut varieties – which already adapts well to different climates – become even more resilient to disease, pests and extreme weather.
Frank Nolin, a retired businessman who manufactured agricultural equipment for Georgia farms, is designing and building small-scale equipment for Africa through the Feed the Future Peanut Innovation Lab at the University of Georgia. CAES News
Frank Nolin, a retired businessman who manufactured agricultural equipment for Georgia farms, is designing and building small-scale equipment for Africa through the Feed the Future Peanut Innovation Lab at the University of Georgia.
Malawi’s journey to self-reliance benefits US small business
One big key to improving peanut crop quality and market reliability in Malawi is post-harvest equipment. The Peanut Innovation Lab helped match up the people who want to buy peanuts with Frank Nolin, a retired steel equipment manufacturer who spent his career building equipment for the US peanut industry. By making it possible for buyers to sort nuts for size and quality, Nolin’s equipment allows buyers to separate nuts by grade and reward farmers based on quality, as well as separate groundnuts for sale in different markets.
Children enjoy a snack at school in Guyana in 2010. The school snack program used locally-sourced peanut butter and casava bread to supplement kids’ diets and stoke the local economy. The program was started with money and guidance from USAID’s Peanut Collaborative Research Program, the precursor to the Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Peanut. CAES News
Children enjoy a snack at school in Guyana in 2010. The school snack program used locally-sourced peanut butter and casava bread to supplement kids’ diets and stoke the local economy. The program was started with money and guidance from USAID’s Peanut Collaborative Research Program, the precursor to the Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Peanut.
USAID peanut school-snack program leaves impact in Guyana
Seven years after a U.S.-led research project to increase peanut production ended, thousands of children in one of the most remote parts of the world continue to get a healthy snack every day, and women are bringing more income into the home through local small businesses.  
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